Alpha-gal syndrome – A case report of tick-borne anaphylactic shock
  • Jiri Muller
    Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Pilsen University Hospital, Pilsen, Czech Republic
  • Jaroslav Radej
    Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Pilsen University Hospital, Pilsen, Czech Republic
  • Miroslav Kriz
    Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Pilsen University Hospital, Pilsen, Czech Republic
  • Eliska Hunkova
    Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Pilsen University Hospital, Pilsen, Czech Republic
  • Jan Kasparek
    Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Pilsen University Hospital, Pilsen, Czech Republic
  • Martin Matejovic
    Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Pilsen University Hospital, Pilsen, Czech Republic

Keywords

Alpha-gal Syndrome, Anaphylactic Shock, Sepsis Mimics, Meat Allergy, Tick Allergy

Abstract

The most common cause of vasoplegic shock in critical care is sepsis. However, although rarely and only in specifically sensitised individuals previously bitten by a tick, red meat may provoke a delayed allergic reaction called an alpha-gal syndrome. We present a case of a protracted life-threatening manifestation of alpha-gal syndrome, which, due to an unusual absence of typical features of anaphylaxis can masquerade as septic shock and calls attention to the premature diagnostic closure as a contributor to diagnostic error. Alpha-gal syndrome is a relatively new, but increasingly recognised health issue. We propose that alpha-gal syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vasoplegic shock of unclear aetiology even in the absence of typical allergic symptomatology and typical allergen exposure since alpha-gal is present in a wide variety of carriers.

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    Published: 2023-06-19
    Issue: 2023: Vol 10 No 7 (view)


    How to cite:
    1.
    Muller J, Jaroslav Radej, Miroslav Kriz, Eliska Hunkova, Jan Kasparek, Martin Matejovic. Alpha-gal syndrome – A case report of tick-borne anaphylactic shock. EJCRIM 2023;10 doi:10.12890/2023_003939.