A case of liquorice-infused marijuana causing syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess
  • Asnia Latif
    Department of Internal Medicine, Rutgers NJMS Trinitas Regional Medical Center, Elizabeth, New Jersey, USA
  • Muniba Naqi
    Department of Internal Medicine, Rutgers NJMS Trinitas Regional Medical Center, Elizabeth, New Jersey, USA
  • James F. McAnally
    Department of Nephrology, Rutgers NJMS Trinitas Regional Medical Center, Elizabeth, New Jersey, USA

Keywords

Licorice, liquorice, marijuana, mineralocorticoid

Abstract

Marijuana has long been used both for recreational and medicinal purposes. Most of the available forms of marijuana contain additives such as liquorice to enhance its flavour. Liquorice increases the amounts of cortisol in the body and produces metabolic abnormalities seen in primary hyperaldosteronism. Liquorice extracts are mixed with marijuana in the same way as for tobacco. We describe a case of apparent mineralocorticoid excess due to excessive smoking of liquorice-laced marijuana. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of apparent mineralocorticoid excess caused by marijuana use.

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    Published: 2023-08-21
    Issue: 2023: Vol 10 No 9 (view)


    How to cite:
    1.
    Latif A, Naqi M, McAnally JF. A case of liquorice-infused marijuana causing syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess. EJCRIM 2023;10 doi:10.12890/2023_003991.

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