Baker’s yeast might not always be good for everyone – a case of percutaneous gastrostomy tube induced Saccharomyces cerevisiae peritonitis in an immunocompromised patient
  • Mohammad Kloub
    Saint Michael's Medical Center
  • Muhammad Hussain
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint Michael’s Medical Center, Newark, USA
  • Fnu Marium
    Jinnah Sindh Medical University, Karachi, Pakistan
  • Atheer Anwar
    General Physician
  • Ahmad Haddad
    Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Michael’s Medical Center, Newark, USA
  • Jihad Slim
    Department of Infectious Disease, Saint Michael’s Medical Center, Newark, USA
  • Yatinder Bains
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint Michael’s Medical Center, Newark, USA

Keywords

Percutaneous gastrostomy tube, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, peritonitis, HIV

Abstract

Peritonitis, the inflammation of the protective membrane surrounding parts of the abdominal organs, is a common clinical pathology with multifactorial aetiologies. While bacterial infections are well-recognised as a cause of peritonitis, fungal infections remain relatively uncommon especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used for breadmaking and as a nutritional supplement. This fungus has been reported to induce peritonitis in patients on peritoneal dialysis. However, it has never been reported as secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion in immunocompromised patients. We present a 64-year-old female with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed S. cerevisiae peritonitis following PEG tube insertion. The case highlights the importance of considering rare organisms when treating immunocompromised patients with peritonitis, especially after gastrointestinal tract penetration or peritoneal membrane disruption.

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    Published: 2024-03-01
    Issue: 2024: Vol 11 No 4 (view)


    How to cite:
    1.
    Kloub M, Hussain M, Marium F, Anwar A, Haddad A, Slim J, Bains Y. Baker’s yeast might not always be good for everyone – a case of percutaneous gastrostomy tube induced Saccharomyces cerevisiae peritonitis in an immunocompromised patient. EJCRIM 2024;11 doi:10.12890/2024_004354.

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