A Case of Infectious Purpura Fulminans: An Unusual Organism and Method of Diagnosis

  • Pei Chia Eng Department of General Medicine, Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Catherine Bryant Department of General Medicine and Department of Clinical Gerontology, Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Stephen H.D. Jackson Department of General Medicine and Department of Clinical Gerontology, Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Abstract

Infectious purpura fulminans is a rapidly progressive skin necrosis that has a mortality rate of 30%1,2. Here, we describe a case of infectious purpura fulminans caused by Capnocytophaga, diagnosed by a blood film.

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  • Published: 2014-04-24

    Issue: Vol. 1 (2014) (view)

    Section: Articles

    How to cite:
    1.
    Eng PC, Bryant C, Jackson SH. A Case of Infectious Purpura Fulminans: An Unusual Organism and Method of Diagnosis. EJCRIM 2014;1 doi:10.12890/2014_000048.