Foodborne Botulism: Neglected Diagnosis

  • Nuno Zarcos Palma Serviço de Medicina Interna, Hospital Padre Américo, Centro Hospitalar Tâmega e Sousa, Penafiel, Portugal http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7036-9976
  • Mariana da Cruz Serviço de Medicina Interna, Hospital Padre Américo, Centro Hospitalar Tâmega e Sousa, Penafiel, Portugal
  • Vítor Fagundes Serviço de Medicina Interna, Hospital Padre Américo, Centro Hospitalar Tâmega e Sousa, Penafiel, Portugal
  • Lindora Pires Serviço de Medicina Interna, Hospital Padre Américo, Centro Hospitalar Tâmega e Sousa, Penafiel, Portugal

Keywords

Botulism, botulinum toxin, Clostridium botulinum, foodborne

Abstract

Botulism is rare neuroparalytic disease caused by botulinum toxin, one of the most toxic substances known. Foodborne botulism is caused by consumption of foods contaminated with botulinum toxin. The clinical manifestations are flaccid, symmetrical, descending paralysis affecting cranial and peripheral nerves. The only specific treatment is botulinum antitoxin. We report the case of a 37-year-old man with gastrointestinal manifestations and posterior cranial nerve palsy who was diagnosed with botulism infection. Clinicians should be aware of rare causes of infection and determine the aetiology of symptoms.

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  • Published: 2019-05-17

    Issue: LATEST ONLINE (view)

    Section: Articles

    How to cite:
    Zarcos Palma, N., da Cruz, M., Fagundes, V., & Pires, L. (2019). Foodborne Botulism: Neglected Diagnosis. European Journal of Case Reports in Internal Medicine, 2. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.12890/2019_001122